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Sarah Hanson-Young urges Australian government to ‘put money on the table’ at biodiversity Cop

The biodiversity Cop is aiming to reach a target of $200bn through pledges from nations in attendance. Australia is yet to contribute, a move Sarah Hanson-Young is urging the government to reconsider:

Well, it is a lot of money but it is what is needed to say nature to protect our planet and to halt the destruction of all the things that we hold dear. Our trees are plants and native animals. What makes it beautiful and wonderful to be a human being – to be able to be surrounded by clean air, clean water and clean soil to grow our food. $200bn must be found.

I am disappointed in and this needs to be understood is that despite Australia coming to this conference, talking about the need for the targets and Tanya Plibersek as minister has been very clear on the support for the 30 by 30 target – we need stronger action on the extinction targets. But no money from Australia was put on the table to help those negotiations come along.

We saw a lot of money pledged by countries like Germany. France made another contribution this morning. So other countries are putting money on the table.

It’s been disappointing to say Australia hasn’t contributed yet. In the final hours of the negotiations. The Australian government can help help keep him ambition high by putting some more money on the table to help because we are a rich country by global standards and there are many other countries in the world where the impact of the environment being destroyed is so significant. They tend to be the poor countries the most vulnerable countries. They do need assistance not just on the land but also in the sea.

You can read more on this topic from environment reporter Lisa Cox:

Key events

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Bureau of Meteorology releases Christmas Day forecast

It’s officially a week before Christmas, which means the forecasters at the Bureau of Meteorology are fairly confident they can tell us what whether we can set up for an al fresco Christmas lunch or not.

For some parts of the country, there is a chance of showers:

Here’s what Dean Narramore told ABC News Breakfast:

Particularly in the south, we can get some volatile weather but all the patterns really starting to change as we move into later part of this week.

So we’ll see a weather system move through southern parts of the country, Thursday and Friday. Then a big high-pressure system behind it will quickly move into the Tasman Sea and then kind of sit there over the Christmas weekend into early the following week and normally that drives a lot of warm weather across much of southern parts of the country and our guidance is showing a similar pattern with that as well.

So at least with southern parts of the country we’re looking pretty good and even on the east coast, maybe a degree or two out, but it’s looking really good.

Repairing nature ‘becoming as important’ a target for business as emissions

Sabra Lane:

In Australia, it’s estimated that we need to spend over a billion dollars a year to protect and restore nature. Are you able to quantify how much the commonwealth spends right now per year to do that?

Tanya Plibersek:

Well, it’s not just commonwealth spending that’s important, of course. I mean, we increased spending in the last budget, we’ve got $1.8bn across budget years to invest in nature.

State territory, governments play a role. Philanthropists play a role, business plays some role. And again, we’re hoping that they’ll play a bigger role as we established our nature repair market.

Absolutely, of course, we can do better in Australia and that’s our plan. That’s our intention as the government that’s why we’ve already increased environmental funding.

Asked about the next budget, Plibersek said the government is committed to upping funding for nature but that it needs to be a whole-of-society effort as repairing nature comes to be as important a target for businesses as their carbon footprint.

Well, we already saw an increase in the October budget. And we determined not only to increase government funding, but to make it easier for others to invest in repairing nature as well.

The last report we saw on the interest from business in investing in nature repair market that is businesses prepared to look at around $137bn worth of incoming nature.

This is becoming as important for businesses as reducing their carbon pollution. We’ve got to make sure that all of our investment is effective. So the government investment, both state and commonwealth investments, your private sector, philanthropists, we can work together to make a real difference for Australia’s natural environment.

Australia and Norway lead global cooperation on protecting oceans, Plibersek says

Environment minister Tanya Plibersek spoke to AM Radio this morning from Montreal where she is attending the biodiversity Cop.

Plibersek says she believes Australia’s domestic targets of protecting 30% of land and 30% of oceans by 2030, and zero extinctions should be global targets.

Despite Sarah Hanson-Young’s criticism this morning that Australia has yet to pledge anything to the summit’s $200bn target, Plibersek says our nation has been a leader at the conference:

Australia has been playing a really positive role in negotiating the final agreement. We’ve really gone from environmental laggard to leader on the world stage.

One of the examples of that is the higher ambition statement that we worked out with Norway. A statement to give stronger protection to our oceans that’s been signed on to over the last 24 hours by 37 other countries so it’s just an example I guess is the kind of positive role Australia can play globally.

Comcast global outages affects SBS streaming of Fifa World Cup final

Did you have trouble with your upload speed trying to watch the World Cup on SBS this morning?

The broadcaster acknowledged that a global outage issue with its content provider, Comcast, was causing problems.

A global outage issue with our content provider, Comcast, is currently affecting the timely upload of the FIFA World Cup 2022™ Final Mini Matches, Highlights & full match replay. Our teams are urgently awaiting news on a fix – we’ll keep everyone updated as soon as we’re able!

— SBS On Demand (@SBSOnDemand) December 18, 2022

Of course, if you have been having trouble with streaming, you can always turn to our match report to give you the play by play of how Argentina beat the defending champions to take the title.

Two bodies found after housefire in Victoria

Police are investigating the circumstances surrounding a fatal house fire in Lara, a town just out of Geelong.

Emergency services were called about 4.45am this morning. After extinguishing the blaze, fire crews found two bodies.

Victoria police say:

The cause of the fire is yet to be determined and a crime scene has been established.

Detectives from the Arson Squad and a fire investigator will attend the scene this morning.

Sarah Hanson-Young urges Australian government to ‘put money on the table’ at biodiversity Cop

The biodiversity Cop is aiming to reach a target of $200bn through pledges from nations in attendance. Australia is yet to contribute, a move Sarah Hanson-Young is urging the government to reconsider:

Well, it is a lot of money but it is what is needed to say nature to protect our planet and to halt the destruction of all the things that we hold dear. Our trees are plants and native animals. What makes it beautiful and wonderful to be a human being – to be able to be surrounded by clean air, clean water and clean soil to grow our food. $200bn must be found.

I am disappointed in and this needs to be understood is that despite Australia coming to this conference, talking about the need for the targets and Tanya Plibersek as minister has been very clear on the support for the 30 by 30 target – we need stronger action on the extinction targets. But no money from Australia was put on the table to help those negotiations come along.

We saw a lot of money pledged by countries like Germany. France made another contribution this morning. So other countries are putting money on the table.

It’s been disappointing to say Australia hasn’t contributed yet. In the final hours of the negotiations. The Australian government can help help keep him ambition high by putting some more money on the table to help because we are a rich country by global standards and there are many other countries in the world where the impact of the environment being destroyed is so significant. They tend to be the poor countries the most vulnerable countries. They do need assistance not just on the land but also in the sea.

You can read more on this topic from environment reporter Lisa Cox:

‘Absolutely crazy’: Hanson-Young calls on state governments to end native forest logging

There’s also a push to commit countries to protecting 30% of the world’s lands and oceans by 2030 at the biodiversity Cop. The Albanese government made that target one of its election promises, but Sarah-Hanson Young says it’s not enough:

But the big question is what happens to that remaining 70%?

We need the framework and the rules and the regulations, and the commitment to making sure that that remaining 70% of the world’s landmass and oceans aren’t just destroyed because we are at a tipping point.

In Australia alone is ranked third in the world for extinction and threatened species. It is not good enough. We need to change business as usual. Business as usual is pushing us down a path where by 2050 we will lose a koala, by 2030 many more other species will be gone or facing extinction.

We need to put a halt to extinction now. We need to stop destroying the critical habitat. In Australia, that would mean stopping things like stopping native forests logging.

It is absolutely crazy that at the same time as we’ve got world leaders talking about plans to restore nature to be planting more trees. Back home in Australia, we have governments that are allowing the destruction of our native forests, whether that’s Victoria, New South Wales or Tasmania, where they are both logging and mining the Tarkine.

Biodiversity summit targets ‘watered down’, Hanson-Young says

Greens spokesperson for the environment Sarah Hanson-Young spoke to RN Breakfast from Montreal where she is attending the biodiversity Cop alongside environment minister Tanya Plibersek and independent senator David Pocock.

At the summit, 190 countries have been meeting to try to agree on 22 targets to enable the world to halt biodiversity loss but Hanson-Young says “the key targets around halting and stopping extinction has been watered down significantly”:

The text that was put on the table today and the minister is now finalising is weaker than what many of us wanted – this was meant to be the “Paris” moment for nature and our environment.

Housing tops parliament’s new year agenda

Affordable housing will be the next parliamentary priority as the federal government releases its promised plan to help ease the crisis.

After addressing election commitments to tackle the climate crisis, childcare costs and establish a national anti-corruption commission in 2022, the government has revealed housing as being first on its agenda for 2023.

Proposed laws to establish the housing australia future fund as well as two independent advisory bodies have been published. Consultation on the proposals will be open until mid-January before parliament’s return in February.

The $10bn future fund is expected to provide ongoing investment returns which will go towards new social and affordable homes.

Housing minister Julie Collins said returns from the fund would deliver the government’s commitment of 30,000 new social and affordable homes in the fund’s first five years.

This would include 4,000 homes for women and children impacted by family and domestic violence or older women at risk of homelessness.

– from AAP

Good morning!

Two of the nine people being sought by Victoria police over Saturday’s pitch invasion at the A-League Men Melbourne derby have made themselves known to investigators.

The invasion of the Melbourne Victory/Melbourne City football clash left a player, a referee and a TV camera operator injured. Images of nine men showed one holding a bucket of sand, another holding a lit flare in the stands and another hanging from a goalpost.

Our sport editor Mike Hytner has more on this story:

In weather news, South Australia braces for more flooding as two Murraylands towns are threatened by levee breaches.

South Australia’s State Emergency Service has issued watch and act warnings for Ponde and Murrawong, due to a levee breach and potential levee breach respectively.

In Ponde, the levee broke early yesterday morning and has filled flood plains more than a kilometre from the river.

A dingo attack on a young boy on K’gari (Fraser Island) late yesterday has left the child in hospital.

The attack happened as the boy – believed to be five years old – was playing on a beach on the island when he was “jumped on” and bitten.

RACQ LifeFlight Rescue said:

The child sustained multiple minor bites before his father managed to get the dingo off him.

Deadly civil unrest in Peru has left Australians stranded in the country. The Department of Foreign Affairs said 171 Australians had made contact with the Australian embassy in Lima.

Protests broke out across the country last week, sparked by the ousting of former president Pedro Castillo – this explainer will help you understand it a little better.

Let’s get going.




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